How to Enjoy Driving on a Digger if you have Motion Sickness

Enjoying your day out at Diggerland Theme Park

If you have motion sickness but you have always dreamed of manning your own digger, know that there are both natural and medical approaches that can ensure you have the time of your life at Diggerland Theme Park!

If you have motion sickness, then know that it is usually something that passes, and that sometimes, it just involves feeling a little dizzy for a couple of minutes.

Motion sickness is not actually a disease; it is no more than a normal response to, because there is a difference between what we are focusing on (a fixed point in our environment) and the movement of our vehicle.

Dig-a-Round at Diggerland Theme Park

Kids and Women can be more prone to Motion Sickness

Motion sickness is rare in toddlers. In fact, it reaches its peak by the age of 12, declining between 12 and 21.

At Diggerland Theme Park, children from the age of two to sixteen or seventeen can drive a digger, so by this time they should be just fine.

Also, if by any chance they feel like enjoying another activity, they will be happy to know that there are many rides and activities to choose from. There is a sizeable indoor play area featuring slides, bouncy castles, arcade games, and more.

Preventing Motion Sickness at Diggerland Theme Park

Battling nausea and wooziness while travelling is important if the journey is to be enjoyed. One way to do so is through prevention. Researchers at Siena College found that feeling stressed can make you feel more symptoms of motion sickness.

Children can benefit from knowing that although riding a digger at Diggerland Theme Park is a different experience, they can feel more in control if they drive the digger themselves.

They should know what to expect, but be encouraged to take a chilled out stance to any potential symptoms. They should know that they can simply get off if they are feeling a tiny bit dizzy, and take place in a plethora of other activities with their siblings and parents.

Mini Tractors at Diggerland Theme Park
Dumper Trucks at Diggerland Theme Park

Natural Approaches to Motion Sickness

Some natural methods people use to quell motion sickness include consuming ginger (in the form of a ginger ‘shot’ or by chewing on candied ginger). A ginger shot can be a little too strong for younger children, but older teens will probably enjoy naturally squeezed ginger juice blended with orange juice, or a cup of tea that has been infused with ginger.

Acupressure has been found to be useful for nausea, meanwhile. A study by researchers at the Center for Advancing Health found that stimulating an acupoint on the wrist can help reduce this symptom of motion sickness. To be precise, pressure should be applied to the pericardium (P6) point, located around two inches from the base of the palm, on the inner side of the wrist.

Use your thumb to apply gentle pressure to this spot, and make sure you target both wrists. Eating a small amount of food can also be helpful, so give your child a healthy snack a few minutes before they get on the digger. Ensure the snack isn’t heavy or greasy so it does not strain their digestive system.

What about Medication?

For people that have serious motion sickness, doctors sometimes describe medications like Dramamine, which is safe for children aged two and above.

In some cases, medications for motion sickness can cause drowsiness. Therefore, the decision of whether or not to give these should be taken after discussion with a paediatrician.

Keeping stress down and expectations realistic will help stave off symptoms, and you should also try natural remedies such as ginger. Finally, remember to bring light, healthy, sugar- and fat-free snacks that will help ensure your child enjoys his or her first digger drive to the full!

Dippy Ducks at Diggerland Theme Park

If you are planning a visit to Diggerland Theme Park, know that there are so many activities available that kids or parents with motion sickness should know that they will have a good time.

Written by our guest blogger Jane Sandwood